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Politics at St. Andrew’s

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Politics at St. Andrew’s

Photo: Lucas Source Licence

Photo: Lucas Source Licence

Photo: Lucas Source Licence

Will Canellakis, Editor In Chief

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As a high-school in a relatively democratic area, a great many people are experiencing a certain level of angst when discussing the outcome of the recent presidential election. There is a murmur of disbelief that echoes through the halls of the school which seems to repeat a question over and over: “What will he do?”

The outcome of the election resulted in many staring open-mouthed at their TV in the wee hours of the morning in stunned disbelief – whether in support of, or against, our new president- elect. However, this disbelief then began to manifest itself into something more tangible – the actual realization that our next President is the one and only Donald Trump, a man who is so sporadic that predicting his next step as President is about the same as playing a guessing game.

When he first put his name in the candidacy, a swarm of jokes emerged, many centering around the idea that he acts like a reality TV show host. Despite the continuance of these jokes his presidency is now set: this reality tv show host will be our next President.

Due to his unpredictable nature, it is our duty to do something. Whether that something is going into politics to ensure that his legacy is continued, or, to the contrary, never repeated; or going into art and painting a vivid image of the diverse feelings America is experiencing today – we all have a moral obligation to be intelligent. We all need to open our eyes to the reality of the world instead of merily joking about it. We need to take action when something emerges – escape the rut that continuously pulls our attention back onto ourselves and think bigger.

By thinking bigger- by thinking beyond ourselves – we can all hopefully escape the bubble of “self” and start becoming active agents in our communities, rather than passive bystanders. Thus, we can release our angst and channel that energy into something constructive – whatever that may be.

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